How Pornography Affects Fashion Styles

Nowadays, a fashion advert doesn’t seem effective unless it lingers at the edge of pornography. The models pose with open or pouted mouths, eyes half closed as if in a trance. The goal is to show a state of arousal. Sometimes they lie on their backs with legs splayed. And they don’t shy off at exposing acres of flesh: All hair free after hours of airbrushing using photoshop or other editors. In the end, we have a perfect photo of the perfect dame, gleaming like the bodywork of a sleek sports car or a Latina on nudevista.

Such suggestive and sexualized images have dominated fashion campaigns and designers compete to produce new and arresting advertisements. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly difficult for a viewer to distinguish between ads and the pornography you see in free porn sites. It seems like adverts for women’s clothes have gone from being fun, sassy and empowering and now lie on the borderline of pornography. This sexualized content is now targeted at boys and men rather than ladies who buy the product.

 In one Chanel advert featuring Keira Knightley, she lay on her back, with only a trench on. She pouts her lips suggestively like you’d see on nudevista before the sex begins. In another fashion advert, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley lies knickerless and braless in a trench coat. In short, they are selling nothing except sex. The goal is to sell sex, not fashion. This is the pornification of fashion.

In ‘The Beauty Myth’ by Naomi Wolf, she defines this explicit fashion as “beauty pornography”. Just as in free porn sites, this beauty pornography puts the guilt and shame back into how women experience sex. You’ll find that there’s increased subordination and objectification of women. The same themes you’d find in nudevista porn storylines are the ones you find in fashion ads.

The approach taken by designer brands that employ this kind of advertising is to objectify the erotic female body while at the same time glamorizing violence and abuse.

In ‘The Beauty Myth’ by Naomi Wolf, she defines this explicit fashion as “beauty pornography”. Just as in free porn sites, this beauty pornography puts the guilt and shame back into how women experience sex. You’ll find that there’s increased subordination and objectification of women. The same themes you’d find in nudevista porn storylines are the ones you find in fashion ads.

The approach taken by designer brands that employ this kind of advertising is to objectify the erotic female body while at the same time glamorizing violence and abuse.

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The advert tells you to buy their cologne and orgasming women will surround you. To buy their shampoo and your sexual desires will be unleashed during your morning shower. It has changed us into consumers, not only of fashion but of sexual desire. Rather than putting emphasis on power dressing using iconic trailblazers, we are selling free porn in an industry whose influence is expansive.